Taioba in the Kitchen

by the Editors

Taioba in the Kitchen

Elizabeth Cecil

1. Separate Leaf and Stem To prep taioba for cooking, you will need to remove the flesh from the stem and ribs. This is simple; just use your fingertips to pull away each fleshy section of the taioba leaf from the main stem and from between the secondary ribs. You will have a pile of ribbony taioba to cook, and a funny looking leaf skeleton to compost.

By high summer, the big leaves of the taioba plant are the size of elephant ears, and harvesting just one or two can provide a quick and tasty side dish or ingredient to use in other dishes. Taioba must be cooked to eliminate trace amounts of calcium oxalate, but the cooking is fast—less than 5 minutes. Traditionally, a taioba sauté starts with a bit of garlic and olive oil, and finishes with a splash of water for a quick simmer. Follow the steps on this page (demonstrated by Debora Ferreira de Souza of the Scottish Bakehouse) to prep and cook taioba.